Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2010

One of my favorite biblical scholars and an all-around good guy has been awarded (finally! *cough cough*) his doctorateMichael Barber of Reasons for Faith, The Sacred Page and JP the Great University is now Dr. Michael Barber

My heartiest (and real) congratulations and imaginary slaps on the back to Michael, his wife and his family! I raise a pretend glass of the finest French champagne (hey, it’s my daydream) to you!

Read Full Post »

St. John the Baptist. Pointing us the way to Christ.

Steve Wood on his EWTN radio program Faith and Family Live was talking about the prophetic ministry of St. John the Baptist.  He made some thought-provoking points worth mentioning here.  He referenced Men’s Conferences and other Catholic conferences.  He asked how their success should be measured, by how good everyone felt when they left, or how troubled they were when they left.  He tied it back to John the Baptist, because John the Baptist wasn’t reassuring his listeners; he was shaking them up and usually telling them things that frankly, they did not want to hear.  He said we should be aiming at our conferences to be speaking truth, even truths that are hard to hear.

Steve also discussed the Baptist’s warning to the Jews that their inheritance as Jews was not enough, alone, to please God and their birthright was not an assured place in heaven. Then Steve applied John the Baptist teaching to us, saying (paraphrased from memory):

There are no “coattail Catholics.” Yes, you have a great inheritance as a Catholic.  Yes, you were blessed that your mom and dad were Catholic and you were baptized into the Catholic Church.  But I’m telling you right now that unless you repent, unless you begin living your life in a way that is pleasing to the promises of Christ Jesus, you will wind up in Hell and not only that: you’ll be in a worse spot in Hell than unbaptized pagansYes, you heard that rightIf you squander your inheritance, that’s where you are going.

That’s a little bit of awesome and a whole lot to digest for some of us.  Steve Wood did credit to John the Baptist today.

Read Full Post »

Caught an interesting article in the Detroit Free Press.  I was shocked that Nancy Pelosi was not also attending because this sorta thing seems to be right up her alley — or squarely in her playbook, depending on how you look at it. 

Seems the faithful Christians in the Episcopalian, Methodist and United Unitarian churches here in Detroit are making sure that Conservatives aren’t hijacking Jesus’ message.  That message was apparently not about the Kingdom of God, or the Way to the Father or eternal salvation.  Apparently, Jesus’ message was all about establishing perfect social justice here on little ol’ earth:

Saying that social justice is at the heart of Christianity and other religions, activists gathered today in a Detroit church to say that faith can play an active role in fighting for change.

The meeting at Christ Church Detroit, among the day’s events as part of the U.S. Social Forum, illustrated the role of religious groups in political and social movements.

Three years ago in Atlanta at the last U.S. Social Forum, there was little religious participation, say organizers. But this year, a number of forums, workshops and services are focused on religious organizations and faith. And a Detroit church, Central United Methodist, has been the center for organizing this year’s forum.

“Faith is about justice,” said the Rev. Ed Rowe, pastor of Central United and a social activist. “Without justice, faith is living a lie. If your faith is just about helping only the people who are inside stained glass windows, we ought to quit.”

The U.S. Social Forum is attracting thousands of activists from across the U.S.

Today’s church gathering, which attracted 100 people or more, featured a re-enactment of a parable about laborers in a vineyard in the Book of Matthew in the Bible. In the story, it seems that the “land owner equals God,” said Lily Mendoza, associate professor of culture and communication at Oakland University.

It led to a discussion about the nature of labor, immigrants and power in the modern world.

Jesus started a “peasant resistance movement,” said Jim Perkinson, professor of social ethics at Ecumenical Theological Seminary in Detroit. “Is the CEO of GM or Chrysler … God?”

Local religious leaders with Detroit-based Interfaith Worker Justice are helping organize a number of events at the forum, including a 9:45 a.m. rally Thursday in front of JP Morgan Chase Bank to protest working conditions of some farm workers and to urge that the bank stop foreclosing on unemployed homeowners.

The Free Press also says that Jewish, Hindu, Muslm and Buddhists are also participating.  No word on whether they are planning to join Jesus’ peasant resistance movement.

I am not sure if the Free Press attempted to contact Nancy Pelosi for her comments on St. Joseph the Worker, or her commitment to communist-ecclesiastical dialogue.

Read Full Post »

This is heartwrenching to watch.  The point of my posting this isn’t to bash on the Scientology cult.  Rather, it’s remarkable that all of these women, who were raised from childhood in the cult of Scientology and presumably were well insulated from Christian teachings and morality, nevertheless express the same horror over their forced abortions, the same realization that life was present and life was taken. 

Abortion is offensive to natural law and it hurts women.  When will women wake up to this lie that is being fed them and their daughters every day?  Abortion Hurts Women.

Read Full Post »