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Posts Tagged ‘Art’

More awesomeness from Likable Art‘s Cory Heimann.  I want to publicly thank Cory for acting on the impulse to send me this video because I really needed to be confirmed in that message today and I feel blessed and honored to have gotten it when I did.  Thank you Cory!

Our Savior lives!  Happy Easter, dear friends, happy Easter!

 

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“Annunciazione” by Pietro Perugino, ca 1489

We break from our Lenten fast to keep the Solemnity of the Annunciation, when Gabriel delivered God’s message to Mary and she said yes

 Visit Deacon Jim‘s weblog, Servant of the Word, for today’s liturgy and homily

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St. Benedict by Herman Nigg

Fr. Tom, showing his love for his sheep, had parts of the Rule of St. Benedict published in today’s bulletin.  I think it is edifying for my parish and me.  In this Year of the Priest, I pass it on for your edification, too.  :-)    

  • Help those who are in trouble.
  • Console the afflicted.  
  • Prefer nothing to the love of Christ.
  • Speak the truth from your heart as from your mouth.    
  • Attribute the good that you find in yourself to God, and not to yourself.    
  • Desire eternal life with all the ardor of your soul.    
  • Listen willingly to the Holy Scriptures.    
  • Daily confess your past faults to God in your prayers with tears and groans, and in the future correct them.    
  • In all things obey the instructions of the Abbot even if, God forbid, he should go astray in his works, remembering this precept of the Lord: Do what they say, but not what they do.    
  • The struggler must be patient, enduring all things that come to him.    
  • We should not seek to be different from others; we should do only what is needful, following the example of the saints.    
  • Our words to others should be few and covered with gentleness.    
  • Honor those who are old.    
  • Love those who are younger.    
  • Pray for your enemies in the love of Christ.    
  • Make peace, before the setting of the sun, with those from whom you have been separated by discord.    
  • And never despair of the mercy of God.    

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Today’s  book is a bit off-the-wall, I know, but I think this is an excellent book for those of us with an insatiable need to know random stuff. 

There really isn’t any good reason to keep building ugly post-VII churches.

Catholic Church Architecture and the Spirit of the Liturgy by Denis McNamara; Foreword by Scott Hahn.  Here is what the publisher says about it:

This unique book delves into the deep meanings of liturgical art and architecture, and by association, the Sacred Liturgy itself. It is meant to help pastors, architects, artists, members of building committees, seminarians, and everyone interested in liturgical art and architecture come to grips with the many competing themes which are at work in church buildings today. The object of Catholic Church Architecture and the Spirit of the Liturgy is help the reader to drink deeply from the wells of the tradition, to look with fresh eyes at things thought to be outdated or meaningless, and glean the principles which underlie the richness of the Catholic faith.

  • Part one presents an emerging area of study: Architectural Theology
  • Part two introduces the readers for the first time to the scriptural foundations of church architecture
  • Part three focuses on the classical tradition of architecture
  • Part four examines iconography as eschatological flash and
  • Part five concludes with a discussion of the Twentieth Century and where we are now in the Age of the Church.

Catholic Church Architecture and the Spirit of the Liturgy is a  foundational sourcebook for studying, designing, building, and renovating Catholic churches, this book is intended to find the middle of the road between differing and sometimes conflicting theories of liturgical architecture.  It will give architects and building committees the theological language and tools to understand the elements of church design by examining past architecture and will help decision makers link these principles to their current building projects.

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An interview from the Catholic News Agency with Abbot Michael John Zielinski, Vice President of the Pontifical Council for the Cultural Heritage of the Church and Sacred Archeology about our Holy Father, the awesome BXVI.  JPII spoke often of the importance of beauty too, so as the Abbott says, this is nothing new.  What IS new is the approach of Pope Benedict to the topic.  I don’t know what it is about this pope but he really seems to get to the heart of the matter, in grace, charity, patience, faithfulness and rationality. 

Vatican City, Dec 2, 2009 / 01:23 pm (CNA).- On November 22, Pope Benedict XVI attracted the eyes of the world to the Sistine Chapel where he welcomed a group of 250 international artists and urged them to renew an old friendship in the “quest for beauty.”  CNA interviewed Abbot Michael John Zielinski, Vice President of the Pontifical Council for the Cultural Heritage of the Church and Sacred Archeology, for further insight into the meaning of this ‘quest’ and its significance in this Papacy.

Commenting on the “via pulchritudinis,” beauty as a way to God, and the Holy Father’s recent emphasis on it, the Benedictine abbot replied, “This is nothing new.  Take a look at Pope Benedict XVI’s liturgy.  The Pope’s liturgy is not a return to tradition, it’s the way to tradition.  It is clearly the expression of… continuity.  He’s bringing out, as it were, making manifest the way of beauty to God.”

Zielinski then mused on the Pope’s awareness, “Have you seen him around people?  He listens very carefully.  He observes.”  The abbot recalled that during the Pope’s audiences, “he has these penetrating eyes.  He doesn’t observe the mass (of people), he observes the individuals…  In his spiritual life, he is also very observant.  He understands the needs of the Church.”

“I think we’ll truly understand this Pontificate in the future because he’s taking us to our principles,” opined the abbot.  “In a world where there’s inflation of words and images, his life of silence, prayer and study is truly a prophetic act today.”

Abbot Michael John alluded to a quote from Thomas Merton, the 20th Century Catholic writer, who once said, “prayer is losing time for God.”

“The Pope believes that ‘losing’ that time is important… You are prepared for the next life in that time.”

You might notice also, said the Benedictine, that the Pope’s “physical self is not over the top, you never see him moving about (exaggeratedly)…, whereas his thought is extensive, it has infinite horizons.”

“His Pontificate is so different from the last one and yet so complementary.”

The abbot the remarked that there is a reform ongoing in the Church, “the reform of Benedict XVI.”

Abbot Michael John said we will soon begin to see the fruits of the Pope’s “reform.”  “He’s preparing the younger generations.  He’s offering them a vision, a vision of life, the world and the church and what it means to be a Christian today.  He’s preparing us, opening the eyes of our hearts.”

“The vision,” Zielinski added, “is a hidden sense, a hidden desire, that of energy and force, and from this vision will come forth new life, … new forms, new expressions, new representations.”

“In Australia at World Youth Day, the young boys and girls returned home with eyes full of vision, and now,” he said, “the world is waiting to see what that vision is going to produce; they’ll write books, write music, build their houses, churches and cities.”

“Hopefully, it will be a life of peace and justice, … a life that can give witness to the Giver of life.”

American expert speaks on significance of Papal vision of beauty.

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..and for you emergents: this.

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There is a Catholic musician that I absolutely love.  His name is Dante Schmitz.  Visit his site and check out his music and his videos.  He’s super talented and as a bonus, he’s hilarious!  He also tours with Catholic HEART Workcamps and Cory Heimann is his media go-to-guy.  I’m going to post one of his videos so you can see how charmingly tongue-in-cheeky he is!

Hey!  add Dante + Cory + Lonely Ninja + Catholic HEART Workcamp and you get….this.  Enjoy!

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