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Posts Tagged ‘Bible study’

I am very sorry that I have not taken the time to write original posts, or even bothered to re-post others’ articles.  While I have been very busy, I admit to lacking that burning need to share my thoughts on CwG.  That may be due in part to the bible study I lead at my church – perhaps my thoughts are getting channeled overly much there.  Be that as it may, I am trying to rekindle the writing flame, so keep me in your prayers.

Speaking of bible study, we have been able to bring Jeff Cavins’ excellent The Great Adventure Bible Study to our parish.  We’re very excited to have 20 attendees (or pilgrims as I like to call us).

If you read this, please take a moment to pray for our study group as we go through 24 weeks of reading, study, discussion, and prayer on our great adventure.  May God use this time and place to create 20 faithful, joyous, industrious workers, for

the harvest is plentiful, but the laborers few.

Pray!

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One of my favorite biblical scholars and an all-around good guy has been awarded (finally! *cough cough*) his doctorateMichael Barber of Reasons for Faith, The Sacred Page and JP the Great University is now Dr. Michael Barber

My heartiest (and real) congratulations and imaginary slaps on the back to Michael, his wife and his family! I raise a pretend glass of the finest French champagne (hey, it’s my daydream) to you!

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On the blog of The New Theological Movement was this gem revolving around some of my favorite-est things:  St. Michael the Archangel, the importance of humility and the beautiful, intricate symmetry of Sacred Scripture.  As an added bonus, it includes the prayer to St. Michael which I have right over there >>> in my side items. 

Read it and enjoy!

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The Gospel for today is another unique story, the story of the adulterous woman found only in John.  Scholars speculate that this story was a later edition to the text as it does not seem very Johannine, and may have been written by same author of Luke – Acts.  The Church believes it to be inspired scripture and it remains one of the most popular stories in all the Bible.

while Jesus went to the Mount of Olives.  But early in the morning he arrived again in the temple area, and all the people started coming to him, and he sat down and taught them. Then the scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery and made her stand in the middle.  They said to him, “Teacher, this woman was caught in the very act of committing adultery.  Now in the law, Moses commanded us to stone such women.  So what do you say?”  They said this to test him, so that they could have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and began to write on the ground with his finger.   But when they continued asking him, he straightened up and said to them, “Let the one among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.”  Again he bent down and wrote on the ground.  And in response, they went away one by one, beginning with the elders. So he was left alone with the woman before him.  Then Jesus straightened up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?”  She replied, “No one, sir.” Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, (and) from now on do not sin any more.”   John 8:1-11

Our friend Fr. Jon at Redemptorist Preacher takes an in-depth look at the underlying drama to the story; after all, this was a trap being laid for Jesus, one of several instances in the Gospel in which he is challenged by Jewish leaders with a seemingly no-win situation (e.g. the question of paying Roman taxes).  Here the trap is that while Mosaic law (religious) required adulterers to be stoned to death, Roman law (civil) forbade any private capital punishment.  Should Jesus heed the Hebrew law of his ancestors or obey the might of the Roman authorities?   Either way he answers could lead to his own death.  The scribes and Pharisees chose a very visible, crowded venue to challenge him.  How fraught the situation, and how humiliating for this woman, who likely may have been dragged there immediately after being found in flagrante delicto. 

My Sunday to Sunday nonsensical weekly just wanted to discuss the inherent sexual bias of the story and bemoan that women are still being kept down by The Man.  You know, the Church and the Pope and mean guys everywhere.  Blessedly, our Bible study leader decided to scrap the Gospel reflections from the Sunday to Sunday and instead spend the entire time leading our own discussion, which was enlightening and uplifting.  I confess that I disliked this story for a long time.  In my opinion, it was used in an anti-Christian way for far too long, and is the go-to verse for moral relativists everywhere.  But I am so glad that I had this week to study and reflect on it.  I have a whole new appreciation for the complexity of this Gospel.  

Our Bible study was wonderful, too.  We dwelt on Jesus’ silence, his remarkable silence.  In reflecting on our discussion, it occurs to me that this possibly throwaway story shows us the way to be Christians, as Jesus role models the virtues we should aspire to: 

  • Justice
  • Temperance
  • Prudence
  • Courage
  • Faith
  • Hope
  • Love

Everyone discussing this Gospel account sooner or later uses it to point to Jesus’ non-judgment and that oftentimes becomes the sole takeaway from it.  “Jesus said he didn’t judge the woman and neither should we.”  This (I think) is an incorrect lesson for us, or at least not the sole lesson.  Jesus does not condemn the adulteress, but I think he does judge the woman.  In so doing, he actually shows us how to judge.  Never does Jesus tell her she is not a sinner and not guilty of her crime.  In fact, he forgives her and instructs her to turn from her path of sin – “go and sin no more.”   See that?  He did not simply say, “Go on, beat it!”  He did not say, “well then, clearly you are not guilty.” 

Then Jesus straightened up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?”  She replied, “No one, sir.” Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, (and) from now on do not sin any more.”  

The condemnation of the crowd would have been her stoning, her loss of earthly life.  Jesus does not condemn her and in so doing, he presages our Reconciliation sacrament.  Jesus’ pardon refers to her eternal condemnation.  Jesus frees her; he is her savior just as we know he is ours.  He came to free us from our sins.  But inherent in this act of compassion, and mercy is his act of divine justice.  The woman must not sin anymore. 

And what does that mean, “sin no more”?  We know by the Catechism that we are all sinners and fall short of the grace of God.  Is the woman, and are we, required to “sin no more”?  How can we take on such a burden?  What is Jesus telling us?

In order to be absolved of our sins, in order for God’s merciful forgiveness to be ours, we must convert our hearts.  We must renounce the sin in which we find ourselves and we must earnestly intend to not persist in it.  How many of us understand that?  We ask for God’s forgiveness but have we truly renounced our sin within our heart of hearts?  Do we walk into our confession hardened to Jesus’ words?  We know from Revelation and from Pauline letters that we may not persist in our sins, and that Jesus WILL come again to judge the living and the dead.  Our acts on earth will be weighed in the balance.  So we must repent now, and that means to renounce our sins and promise to do better.

So how are we to judge if we should not condemn?  We know that only God knows the secrets of our hearts, and only He has perfect justice and mercy.  We must trust to His justice.  But as Christians, we are called upon to lead our fallen brothers and sisters back to the path, and correct one another in a spirit of love and gentleness.  In good faith, can we allow those entrusted to our care to persist in their sin?  I think we cannot.  Adultery, premarital sex, gossiping, sloth, illegal business practices, addictions, whatever the moral failing, this Gospel is not telling us it is none of our business.  It is showing us the way to intervene as a Christ follower should:  take time to reflect in silence and humility, maybe get down in the dirt a bit to fully understand the situation, see all sides, when finally necessary to speak, do so calmly, temperately and fairly, do not offer condemnation but rather love, forgiveness and a hope for reconciliation, make it clear to the sinner that Christ expects their metanoia.

Our sins are so hard to renounce, our hearts slow to convert.  Speaking the truth in charity and gentleness must be matched by our own humility, our understanding of our own failures.  We have a faith that goes beyond following an established set of rules.  Our faith requires us to devote our time, energy, intellect and spirit in a constant conversion away from ourselves and over to God.

Our God is so awesome!

Pray with me: 

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended thee and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell, but most of all because they offend thee, my God, who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.

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This beautiful quote was brought to me yesterday by one of my fellow Bible study members, handwritten on a pretty little notecard.  It is from the Mother Directress of St. Sister Faustina, Mary Joseph:

Remember this, Sister, for your whole life: as waters flow from the mountains down into the valleys, so too do God’s graces flow only into humble souls.”  From Diary, Divine Mercy in My Soul

Is humility the key to it all?  Or mayhaps a keystone?  Is it the building block of the other virtues?  It is of such necessary preeminence in our faith lives.  We cannot love without it, we cannot submit to God’s will without it, we cannot ask for real forgiveness without it, we cannot sacrifice without it.  In fact, we cannot be who we are called to be without the gift of humility.

The Catholic Encyclopedia says this:

Humility, inasmuch as it seems to keep the mind and heart submissive to reason and to God, has its own function in connection with faith and all the other virtues, and it may therefore be said to be a universal virtue.

It is therefore a virtue which is necessary for salvation, and as such is enjoined by Our Divine Saviour, especially when He said to His disciples: “Learn of me, because I am meek, and humble of heart: and you shall find rest to your souls” (Matthew 11:29). He also teaches this virtue by the words, “Blessed are ye when they shall revile you, and persecute you and speak all that is evil against you, untruly, for my sake: Be glad and rejoice, for your reward is very great in heaven” (Matthew 5:11-12).

Prayer:  God humble me so that I may submit more fully each day to Your divine will for my life.  Empty me so I may be filled with your grace.   Amen.

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I’ve been in conversations with my Protestant friends lately, particular one young evangelical I love.  I’ve been trying to get them to read the Bible.  Does that sound funny?  It strikes me as being not a little ironic, for the Catholic mom to be urging young Evangelicals to read the Bible.  They all own one…I’m just not sure how much actual reading goes on.  If you don’t count the apps that send a little out-of-context verses to their phone or the daily Scripture passage widget on their high-tech church websites (because we are evangelizing through the media, you know), I’m not sure they actually ever read the Bible. 

So, here we have Christians who genuinely love Jesus, profess a great faith, who ardently defend sola scriptura, and who do not read the Bible

So what is forming the faith of these youngsters?  What understanding do they have of their beliefs?  of Christianity and their own particular denomination / sect / bible church?  Well, where they are getting their religious beliefs from seem to be mostly two-fold:

  1. Church services which are a lengthy sermon (usually not much theology there) and worship music
  2. Contemporary Christian Music and … uh…more worship music

So the majority of the doctrinal teaching for many Protestant youth (and most Evangelical kids) is — as far as I can tell — worship music.   And today’s worship music either lacks doctrine or (in a surprising number of instances) contains bad doctrine.  There, I said it.  Modern Christian worship music is bad theology.  I used to think it was sort of repetitious and bland, saccharine and, um..repetitious.  Then I began to think more deeply about it and realized that actually, the music oftens conveys a bad theology.  It’s leading our Christian youth and young people down a bad path.  (I know I’ve promised the post about the dangers of the rising popular Christian music industry a gazillion times.  This is still not that post.  Sorry!)

The above tirade is my rambling way of introducing the real subject of this post, which is that our protesting Protestant brethren are still trying to bring Catholic practices into their Protestant lives.  It’s funny really. 

Here are three articles in this month’s Christianity Today:

COVER PACKAGE
Practically Theological
How churches are teaching doctrine—and finding eager participants.
Sarah Pulliam Bailey | posted 3/15/2010 09:33AM

COVER PACKAGE
The Lost Art Of Catechesis
It’s a tried and true way of teaching, among other things, Christian doctrine.
J. I. Packer and Gary A. Parrett | posted 3/12/2010 10:31AM

COVER STORY
The Mind Under Grace
Why a heady dose of doctrine is crucial to spiritual formation.
Darren C. Marks | posted 3/12/2010 10:30AM

Although I’m being facetitious in my introductory comments, I want to make sure that I make it clear that I am actually very relieved to see that CT is tackling the problem of the lack of doctrinal teaching among Protestant Christians, particularly in the Evangelical movement.  I actually know one Christian young man who does not seem to understand that we believe in a Triune God.  Yes, yes, we need to love God, we need to burn for Him.  But we also need to know God.  Faith AND Reason.  If I hear one more time, “isn’t it really all about loving Jesus?” or “let’s not get hung up on non-salvation issues” or “it’s about Jesus NOT religion“, I’m going to throw my copy of the Catechism at their head.  All that love and fervor, yet no real understanding of the credos of their faith just leads to heresies and Joel Osteen. 

Yeah, I know — Go work on my big post I keep promising.  Meh.

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Today we read the story of the Prodigal son, a parable which is only found in Luke.  I love this parable.  We discussed it this week in my Lenten Bible study, and of course, we discussed the points of view of the main characters and how each of us can – at some point in our lives – identify with all of them : the lost son, the dutiful son and the forgiving father.  Most around the table seem to be identifying with the dutiful son, at this point in their lives.  I thought that was interesting.  I almost always identify with the wayward son, myself but as of late, I had to admit that the parable character I most identify with is the Fatted Calf.  This garnered some chuckles around the table.  Unfortunately, I was only semi-joking…

I did observe that while I don’t frequently relate to the dutiful but resentful older son, if I were present for Jesus ministry, I might find myself in the role of the critical and doubting scribes and Pharisees.  I would probably see Jesus standing with sinners and become judgmental and discount his holiness.  I might gossip about him, or speculate on what shenanigans he is up to.  :-(   This got alot of agreement from our group.

Anyway, for reflection on the the gospel reading, I am sending you to two great sources for further enlightenment.  First, a video by Fr. John Riccardo of Our Lady of Good Counsel here in SE Michigan (which I have posted before).

Second,  biblical scholar Michael Barber‘s treatise on the Prodigal Son which he posted over on The Sacred Page yesterday.  (I wish he had posted it before Thursday, I would have looked very smart “coming up” with these brilliant ideas!)  (totally kidding, I would have given him credit.)

You Can Always Come Home

The Prodigal Son, New Life and Sacramental Imagery  by Michael Barber

*

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As I mentioned the other day, I am participating in a Lenten Bible study.  It’s fantastic. The evening group I am in is a mixed and lively one and quite large: I think we are averaging 16 attendees.  Our focus each week is the Gospel readings for the upcoming Sunday of Lent.

I am not sure why, but the leader is having us use, as source material and background, a series of pamphlets called Sunday by Sunday, published by Good Ground Press.  These pamphlets  aren’t awful, but they aren’t good, and oh boy, I sure shake my head over some of the stuff I read in them.  For instance, this little reworking of the first reading for today, from Exodus.    Here is the NAB version:

Meanwhile Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian. Leading the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb, the mountain of God.

2
There an angel of the LORD appeared to him in fire flaming out of a bush. As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush, though on fire, was not consumed.
3
So Moses decided, “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight, and see why the bush is not burned.”
4
When the LORD saw him coming over to look at it more closely, God called out to him from the bush, “Moses! Moses!” He answered, “Here I am.”
5
God said, “Come no nearer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground.
6
I am the God of your father,” he continued, “the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob.” Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.
7
But the LORD said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know well what they are suffering.
8
Therefore I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey, the country of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites…
13
“But,” said Moses to God, “when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?”
14
 God replied, “I am who am.” Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”
15
God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites: The LORD, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob, has sent me to you. “This is my name forever; this is my title for all generations.
Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15

Now, here is the version in the helpful Sunday by Sunday:

Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian.  As he led the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb, the mountain of God.  There an angel of God appeared to him in fire flaming out of a bush.  As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush, though on fire, was not consumed.  So Moses decided, “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight, and see why the bush is not burned.”

When God saw Moses coming over to look more closely, God called out to him from the bush, “Moses! Moses!” He answered, “Here I am.”  God said, “Come no nearer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground.  I am the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, Hagar, and Sarah; the God of Isaac and Rebecca; the God of Jacob, Leah, and Rachel.”

Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.  But the Holy One said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know  well what they are suffering.  Therefore, I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey.”

“But,” said Moses to God, “when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is this God’s name?’ what am I to tell them?”

God replied, “I am who causes to be.” Then God added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”

God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites: The Holy One, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, the God of Isaac and Rebecca, the God of Jacob, Leah, and Rachel has sent me to you.  This is my name forever; this is my title for all generations.

See that?  see how all the patriarchal references have  been helpfully removed?  See how artfully they added those names of the matriarchs to the list?  Isn’t it nice of Good Ground Press to correct Scripture for us?  We all know that the Jews are just a bunch of sexist pigs anyway, which is why the Bible is full of fathers.  Father this and father that.
In past weeks, I noted in group discussion that the prayers provided by Sunday by Sunday with which we open and close our sessions scrupulously avoid calling God, the Father.  “God the Creator,” “life-giving God,” “Spirit of God”… A litany of New Agey, somewhat Goddess-y, person-centric description of an omnipotent He/She God.  I stated my complaints to the leader and the group.

Blessedly, nearly the entire study group agrees with me that this is offensive.  (Our group has two men, the rest of us are women.)  The only one who does not, has a master’s in Theology, circa 1970.  Perhaps you will draw the same conclusion that I did regarding this fact.

By the way, Good Ground Press is “A Publishing Ministry of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet“.  Honestly, I did not investigate them as I said to myself I would.  But I gotta think that this is no doubt one of those groups of religious women who have not responded to the questionnaires of the Apostolic Visitation

I also wonder if, like the other intractable Women Religious orders here in North America, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet are aging themselves into oblivion.  If their order is as off-the-rails as I suspect they are – and I have every reason to believe they are based on their shameless rewriting of Scripture – then to that I say:

Good Riddance

 What do you think?

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Bishop Jackels of Wichita spoke recently at a Theology on Tap which drew 200 young adults.  (wow!)  Apparently taking to heart the words of St. Jerome (“Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ”), the Bishop not only urged the group to make Bible reading a daily habit, he gave everyone a copy of the New Testament!

This is absolutely fantastic to read about.  Cheers to the Bishop for his faithful guidance and living testimony.  It’s so good to see what good shepherds the Lord has sent us.  And good to read that two hundred young adults came out for Theology on Tap.

I’ll drink to that.  =)

read the article here:  http://cdowk.org/advanceonline/2010/02/18/bishop-jackels-urges-young-adults-to-develop-a-living-relationship-with-jesus/

h/t Catholic News Agency

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Oh.My.Goodness.   

File this under Really Ridiculous, Outlandish Nonsense, Outrageousness, Protestants off the Rails, Relativism…and uh, the post in which Luce almost swears.  The Church of England needs to retrain this chap.  From the Daily Mail of UK (with my comments in red):   

A clergyman has been criticised as ‘highly irresponsible’ after advising his congregation to shoplift following his Nativity sermon. (nothing says “Peace on Earth, good will to men” like shoplifting.  Happy Birthday, Jesus!)   

 Father Tim Jones, 41, broke off from his traditional (wha?  advising Christians to steal isn’t traditional?) annual sermon yesterday to tell his flock that stealing from large chains is sometimes the best option for vulnerable people.   

 ‘It is far better for people desperate during the recession to shoplift than turn to ‘prostitution, mugging or burglary’, he said.  (I can hear Satan now:  “Go on.  It’s only a little sin.  There’s much worse you could do….”)
   

 The married father-of-two insisted his unusual advice did not break the Bible commandment ‘Thou shalt not steal’ – because God’s love for the poor outweighs his love for the rich.  (I missed that part of Scripture.  Er..where did Jesus say that?)   

 But the minister’s controversial sermon at St Lawrence Church in York has been slammed by police, the British Retail Consortium and a local MP, who all say that no matter what the circumstances, shoplifting is an offence.  (Apparently–and tellingly– it was not slammed by Rowan or the other disciples of Pope Henry the Eighth.  But perhaps they haven’t heard about it yet.)

Delivering his festive lesson (is this sarcasm?), Father Jones told the congregation: ‘My advice, as a Christian priest, (can his license be revoked?) is to shoplift.  I do not offer such advice because I think that stealing is a good thing, or  because I think it is harmless, for it is neither.  (It’s a mortal sin, kids.)   

 ‘I would ask that they do not steal from small family businesses, but from large national businesses, knowing that the costs are ultimately passed on to the rest of us in the form of higher prices.   

 ‘I would ask them not to take any more than they need, for any longer than they need.   

 ‘I offer the advice with a heavy heart and wish society would recognise that bureaucratic ineptitude and systematic delay has created an invitation and incentive to crime for people struggling to cope.’  (Oh, that’s brilliant!  actually encourage sin, theft, moral decay FROM THE PULPIT and then blame the system for creating “invitation” and “incentive”.  I kinda think this is like inciting a crime.  This man should be brought up on charges.)He added that he felt society had failed the needy, and said it was far better they shoplift than turn to more degrading or violent options such as prostitution, mugging or burglary.  (Hey, preacher man!  How’s about you get out of the pulpit and go help some needy?  isn’t that what churches are for?)   

Father Jones cited the example of an ex-prisoner who had been forced to live on less than £100, including a crisis loan, over six weeks after his release from jail.   

He continued: ‘My advice does not contradict the Bible’s eighth commandment because God’s love for the poor and despised outweighs the property rights of the rich.  (Sorry, but that’s total Bull$#!+)   

‘Let my words not be misrepresented as a simplistic call for people to shoplift. The observation that shoplifting is the best option that some people are left with is a grim indictment of who we are.   

‘Rather, this is a call for our society no longer to treat its most vulnerable people with indifference and contempt. Providing inadequate or clumsy social support is monumental, catastrophic folly.’   (why is the priest calling on society? isn’t his job to shepherd his flock?  I love liberals who love to preach to Society but then have absolutely no compunction about doing anything personally.)   

I question whether this man has ever read the Bible.  Seriously.  Where in Scripture did Jesus tell the poor to go out and steal theirs?  In what parable, sermon or teaching did Jesus condemn the Roman Empire for their bureaucratic ineptitude and systematic delay?  And when the poor widow offered her mite, did Jesus nudge her and tell her to swipe a few coins out of the offering, because she clearly needed it more than the Temple did?   

People, SNAP OUT OF IT!  Nowhere does Jesus teach us to look to the government to provide charity toward n poor, support for the elderly, welfare checks for the unemployed, food programs for the underemployed, visitation and care for the sick, imprisoned or dying.  He taught us the Christian virtues, in Matthew especially but throughout the Gospel and He taught them to us as individuals, as believers, as disciples of His.  He didn’t say, go out and convert the governments, empires and dictatorships of the world, and have them enact my teachings as state law.  He didn’t say, go and vote for, prop up, support in coup or give your liege loyalty to governments, kings, rulers and despots who will go out and care for the poor and oppressed in my name.  Nope.  Basically, He said, “YOU!  Yes, I’m looking at you.  Go bear fruit in my name.”  They will know we are Christians by our love…not by our voting records or our taxable income.   

But many (too many) of our fellow Christians think they are called on to do God’s work by pointing fingers at institutions and governments and demanding that they do God’s work.  In other words, there is a mess and SOMEONE really OUGHT to do SOMETHING, and then they proceed to look around for the Someone to Do Something.  Then they wash their hands of the whole thing in smug satisfaction because they successfully passed the buck.   This type of “diffusion of responsibility”, also known as the Bystander Effect is what runs liberal theology ideology.  Because let’s face it:  it’s sooooo much easier to pass the buck along to everyone else, isn’t it?  Why get all messy with your hands in the ol’ muck of good-doing when you can sit at home and yell at the telly, or protest outside government buildings in your warm parkas and Starbucks refillable mugs.   

Kids?  Doing good? — That is OUR JOBAs Christians.  Each of us personally.  What this nitwit Anglican priest should be doing is showing the way to Christian virtue, not relaxing in his no doubt well-appointed parsonage, enjoying his Christmas feast in front of the telly to which he is pointing and yelling at the evening’s BBC news broadcast and yelling, “why isn’t the bloody government DOING something about the poor!”  as he burps and swipes the back of his hand nonchalantly across his mouth.   

Ugh.

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