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Posts Tagged ‘liberal nonsense’

As I mentioned the other day, I am participating in a Lenten Bible study.  It’s fantastic. The evening group I am in is a mixed and lively one and quite large: I think we are averaging 16 attendees.  Our focus each week is the Gospel readings for the upcoming Sunday of Lent.

I am not sure why, but the leader is having us use, as source material and background, a series of pamphlets called Sunday by Sunday, published by Good Ground Press.  These pamphlets  aren’t awful, but they aren’t good, and oh boy, I sure shake my head over some of the stuff I read in them.  For instance, this little reworking of the first reading for today, from Exodus.    Here is the NAB version:

Meanwhile Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian. Leading the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb, the mountain of God.

2
There an angel of the LORD appeared to him in fire flaming out of a bush. As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush, though on fire, was not consumed.
3
So Moses decided, “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight, and see why the bush is not burned.”
4
When the LORD saw him coming over to look at it more closely, God called out to him from the bush, “Moses! Moses!” He answered, “Here I am.”
5
God said, “Come no nearer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground.
6
I am the God of your father,” he continued, “the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob.” Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.
7
But the LORD said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know well what they are suffering.
8
Therefore I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey, the country of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites…
13
“But,” said Moses to God, “when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what am I to tell them?”
14
 God replied, “I am who am.” Then he added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”
15
God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites: The LORD, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob, has sent me to you. “This is my name forever; this is my title for all generations.
Exodus 3:1-8, 13-15

Now, here is the version in the helpful Sunday by Sunday:

Moses was tending the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian.  As he led the flock across the desert, he came to Horeb, the mountain of God.  There an angel of God appeared to him in fire flaming out of a bush.  As he looked on, he was surprised to see that the bush, though on fire, was not consumed.  So Moses decided, “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight, and see why the bush is not burned.”

When God saw Moses coming over to look more closely, God called out to him from the bush, “Moses! Moses!” He answered, “Here I am.”  God said, “Come no nearer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place where you stand is holy ground.  I am the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, Hagar, and Sarah; the God of Isaac and Rebecca; the God of Jacob, Leah, and Rachel.”

Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.  But the Holy One said, “I have witnessed the affliction of my people in Egypt and have heard their cry of complaint against their slave drivers, so I know  well what they are suffering.  Therefore, I have come down to rescue them from the hands of the Egyptians and lead them out of that land into a good and spacious land, a land flowing with milk and honey.”

“But,” said Moses to God, “when I go to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ if they ask me, ‘What is this God’s name?’ what am I to tell them?”

God replied, “I am who causes to be.” Then God added, “This is what you shall tell the Israelites: I AM sent me to you.”

God spoke further to Moses, “Thus shall you say to the Israelites: The Holy One, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, the God of Isaac and Rebecca, the God of Jacob, Leah, and Rachel has sent me to you.  This is my name forever; this is my title for all generations.

See that?  see how all the patriarchal references have  been helpfully removed?  See how artfully they added those names of the matriarchs to the list?  Isn’t it nice of Good Ground Press to correct Scripture for us?  We all know that the Jews are just a bunch of sexist pigs anyway, which is why the Bible is full of fathers.  Father this and father that.
In past weeks, I noted in group discussion that the prayers provided by Sunday by Sunday with which we open and close our sessions scrupulously avoid calling God, the Father.  “God the Creator,” “life-giving God,” “Spirit of God”… A litany of New Agey, somewhat Goddess-y, person-centric description of an omnipotent He/She God.  I stated my complaints to the leader and the group.

Blessedly, nearly the entire study group agrees with me that this is offensive.  (Our group has two men, the rest of us are women.)  The only one who does not, has a master’s in Theology, circa 1970.  Perhaps you will draw the same conclusion that I did regarding this fact.

By the way, Good Ground Press is “A Publishing Ministry of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet“.  Honestly, I did not investigate them as I said to myself I would.  But I gotta think that this is no doubt one of those groups of religious women who have not responded to the questionnaires of the Apostolic Visitation

I also wonder if, like the other intractable Women Religious orders here in North America, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet are aging themselves into oblivion.  If their order is as off-the-rails as I suspect they are – and I have every reason to believe they are based on their shameless rewriting of Scripture – then to that I say:

Good Riddance

 What do you think?

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So who won the battle in the most anticipated, scrutinized, studied, criticized and speculated upon Super Bowl in the history of this televised event?  No, I don’t mean the football game, I mean the Focus on the Family ad featuring the mother of Tim Tebow.   (oh, for the record, the Saints beat the Colts, 31-17).

Well, it’s only my opinion but the win clearly belongs to Focus on the Family and the Tebow family, and even more importantly the win also goes to the wider conservative, pro-life movement.  Even more clearly than who the winners are, is that the losers are hands down, unquestionably liberal pro-abortion groups like Planned Parenthood, NOW and Gloria Allred.  Yeah, cause they lost it.  Literally.  Remember all the articles expressing the Left’s outrage over this commercial that was going to “blur the lines of sports and politics”?   We all remember that.  Then the Super Bowl came and the ad (actually two ads) were run.

Nothing.  Nothing outrageous, nothing controversial, nothing offensive.

After seeing the actual commercial, most of us responded with a quizzical look and perhaps a “is that it?” question.  I myself thought I must have missed the real commercial, as the one I saw was so–uncontroversial.  Anyone not already on a side in this debate was left to wonder how come the liberals were trying so hard to shutdown that commercial.  The people in the room I was in, filled with twenty-something year olds of seemingly all political stripes responded with “is that it?” confusion and comments. A big debate about what the big deal was ensued.   And the liberals looked exactly like what they are:  controlling, irrational, anti-Christian and pro-abortion, and certainly not ‘pro-choice,’  if that choice means choosing Life.  The ungluing of the Liberal Left leading up to the Super Bowl wasn’t a pretty sight to see, unless you are on the pro-life side like I am, in which case, watching the left unravel in the weeks before the Super Bowl culminating in the final ‘sssssss’ as the air went out of their bloated windbags upon seeing the actual commercial was priceless. 

I want to say that the pro-abortion side handed the Tebow side the victory, because they clearly overreacted and overreached.  But you know what?  No, I don’t think that is quite right.  The Left lost it, sure and they certainly did  not seem to be in the same ballgame as the Tebow family.  But they didn’t lose the contest for America’s sympathy.  FotF and the Tebows won itby accurately predicting a meltdown on the left.  Looking back on it now, I can see that the win didn’t happen on Sunday, February 7th.  The win occurred in the strategy meetings at FotF.  Yep, altogether a brilliant plan.  Just let it be leaked that Focus on the Family was buying ad time during the Super Bowl, and that the ad in question might feature Tim Tebow.  Then get that corrected to say it’s really going to be about his mom.  Google searches ensue.  Blogs are written that suggest that Pam Tebow will be talking about her difficult choice to bring her pregnancy with Tim to term when doctors recommended she abort him.  Speculation grows like wildfire until it is a near certainty that Pam Tebow will be talking about her difficult choice to bring her pregnancy with Tim to term when doctors recommended she abort him.   Radical liberals and abortion providers go into meltdown, threatening CBS, the NFL and everyone else they can think of.  America takes note warily.  Why are all these people so up in arms?  If they are “pro-choice,” why can’t Mrs. Tebow talk about her choice?  Isn’t choosing Life an equally valid (at the least!) choice?  No, America learns during Super Bowl XLIV:  it’s not.  Choosing Life is not an option for radical pro-choice groups.

Personally, I want to thank Focus on the Family, Pam Tebow, Tim Tebow and all those bloggers out there who let it ‘slip’ that Pam Tebow might talk about abortion during an ad to be run during the Super Bowl.

Well-played!

(I am not the only one who thinks this)

(to see the full Tebow story, go here to Focus on the Family.  Click to view the ad.)

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Oh.My.Goodness.   

File this under Really Ridiculous, Outlandish Nonsense, Outrageousness, Protestants off the Rails, Relativism…and uh, the post in which Luce almost swears.  The Church of England needs to retrain this chap.  From the Daily Mail of UK (with my comments in red):   

A clergyman has been criticised as ‘highly irresponsible’ after advising his congregation to shoplift following his Nativity sermon. (nothing says “Peace on Earth, good will to men” like shoplifting.  Happy Birthday, Jesus!)   

 Father Tim Jones, 41, broke off from his traditional (wha?  advising Christians to steal isn’t traditional?) annual sermon yesterday to tell his flock that stealing from large chains is sometimes the best option for vulnerable people.   

 ‘It is far better for people desperate during the recession to shoplift than turn to ‘prostitution, mugging or burglary’, he said.  (I can hear Satan now:  “Go on.  It’s only a little sin.  There’s much worse you could do….”)
   

 The married father-of-two insisted his unusual advice did not break the Bible commandment ‘Thou shalt not steal’ – because God’s love for the poor outweighs his love for the rich.  (I missed that part of Scripture.  Er..where did Jesus say that?)   

 But the minister’s controversial sermon at St Lawrence Church in York has been slammed by police, the British Retail Consortium and a local MP, who all say that no matter what the circumstances, shoplifting is an offence.  (Apparently–and tellingly– it was not slammed by Rowan or the other disciples of Pope Henry the Eighth.  But perhaps they haven’t heard about it yet.)

Delivering his festive lesson (is this sarcasm?), Father Jones told the congregation: ‘My advice, as a Christian priest, (can his license be revoked?) is to shoplift.  I do not offer such advice because I think that stealing is a good thing, or  because I think it is harmless, for it is neither.  (It’s a mortal sin, kids.)   

 ‘I would ask that they do not steal from small family businesses, but from large national businesses, knowing that the costs are ultimately passed on to the rest of us in the form of higher prices.   

 ‘I would ask them not to take any more than they need, for any longer than they need.   

 ‘I offer the advice with a heavy heart and wish society would recognise that bureaucratic ineptitude and systematic delay has created an invitation and incentive to crime for people struggling to cope.’  (Oh, that’s brilliant!  actually encourage sin, theft, moral decay FROM THE PULPIT and then blame the system for creating “invitation” and “incentive”.  I kinda think this is like inciting a crime.  This man should be brought up on charges.)He added that he felt society had failed the needy, and said it was far better they shoplift than turn to more degrading or violent options such as prostitution, mugging or burglary.  (Hey, preacher man!  How’s about you get out of the pulpit and go help some needy?  isn’t that what churches are for?)   

Father Jones cited the example of an ex-prisoner who had been forced to live on less than £100, including a crisis loan, over six weeks after his release from jail.   

He continued: ‘My advice does not contradict the Bible’s eighth commandment because God’s love for the poor and despised outweighs the property rights of the rich.  (Sorry, but that’s total Bull$#!+)   

‘Let my words not be misrepresented as a simplistic call for people to shoplift. The observation that shoplifting is the best option that some people are left with is a grim indictment of who we are.   

‘Rather, this is a call for our society no longer to treat its most vulnerable people with indifference and contempt. Providing inadequate or clumsy social support is monumental, catastrophic folly.’   (why is the priest calling on society? isn’t his job to shepherd his flock?  I love liberals who love to preach to Society but then have absolutely no compunction about doing anything personally.)   

I question whether this man has ever read the Bible.  Seriously.  Where in Scripture did Jesus tell the poor to go out and steal theirs?  In what parable, sermon or teaching did Jesus condemn the Roman Empire for their bureaucratic ineptitude and systematic delay?  And when the poor widow offered her mite, did Jesus nudge her and tell her to swipe a few coins out of the offering, because she clearly needed it more than the Temple did?   

People, SNAP OUT OF IT!  Nowhere does Jesus teach us to look to the government to provide charity toward n poor, support for the elderly, welfare checks for the unemployed, food programs for the underemployed, visitation and care for the sick, imprisoned or dying.  He taught us the Christian virtues, in Matthew especially but throughout the Gospel and He taught them to us as individuals, as believers, as disciples of His.  He didn’t say, go out and convert the governments, empires and dictatorships of the world, and have them enact my teachings as state law.  He didn’t say, go and vote for, prop up, support in coup or give your liege loyalty to governments, kings, rulers and despots who will go out and care for the poor and oppressed in my name.  Nope.  Basically, He said, “YOU!  Yes, I’m looking at you.  Go bear fruit in my name.”  They will know we are Christians by our love…not by our voting records or our taxable income.   

But many (too many) of our fellow Christians think they are called on to do God’s work by pointing fingers at institutions and governments and demanding that they do God’s work.  In other words, there is a mess and SOMEONE really OUGHT to do SOMETHING, and then they proceed to look around for the Someone to Do Something.  Then they wash their hands of the whole thing in smug satisfaction because they successfully passed the buck.   This type of “diffusion of responsibility”, also known as the Bystander Effect is what runs liberal theology ideology.  Because let’s face it:  it’s sooooo much easier to pass the buck along to everyone else, isn’t it?  Why get all messy with your hands in the ol’ muck of good-doing when you can sit at home and yell at the telly, or protest outside government buildings in your warm parkas and Starbucks refillable mugs.   

Kids?  Doing good? — That is OUR JOBAs Christians.  Each of us personally.  What this nitwit Anglican priest should be doing is showing the way to Christian virtue, not relaxing in his no doubt well-appointed parsonage, enjoying his Christmas feast in front of the telly to which he is pointing and yelling at the evening’s BBC news broadcast and yelling, “why isn’t the bloody government DOING something about the poor!”  as he burps and swipes the back of his hand nonchalantly across his mouth.   

Ugh.

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